Valued Clients,

This month’s blog worked out perfectly as the first Friday of the month was November 1st. For some, today marks Christmas Eve. For others, the anxiety of spending time with the family on Thanksgiving is starting to sink in.

I am not a Christmas enthusiast by any means, but my birthday IS in December, so I look forward to it. Thankfully it is December 3rd *cough cough DontForgetIamYourFavorite* so I still get a birthday and Christmas, none of that “joint bday/Christmas” nonsense. Although this year is a big deal since I am turning 26 which means I finally have to get my own health insurance…Thanks Obama.

Real quickly, I am looking for someone to do December blog, so let me know if interested!

Alright November Blog. November probably signals crunch time for getting the 2020 recruiting plan in place. Lots to do and you all go silent on me. So this Q&A with Wendy is good timing because she may give you some things to consider. Nobody is ever a believer until they hear it from their peers. So maybe you will believe me if you hear from a Client who has been using eSkill for quite some time. I will add a few thoughts in red to Wendy’s responses. But lets dive in:

What is the most important piece of information you need to make a decision about a candidate and how do you measure that?

Wendy: I do not think there is one piece of information. Evaluating a candidate has multiple data points and is essentially matchmaking with the hiring manager and peer team given the answers to said data points.
Self-Awareness is vital though, you and I have talked about an EQ aka Situational Judgement Testing assessment. I think that could certainly help in make better decisions. Looking forward to collaborating on a validated version in 2020

To expand a little on her first point, do you consider the Manager/Employee matchmaking when hiring a candidate? Are you sure that turnover is a result of the employee and not the Manager? And are you using tools to make sure there is a perfect harmony between the two?

If you had to point to one thing that you see other companies do during the selection process that should be eliminated – what would that be?

Wendy: Ambiguity, You should be transparent with your candidates about your interview process and timeline. If you are uncertain yourself then under-promise and over-deliver. Be respectful of everyone’s time and FOLLOW UP

Candidate. Experience. Say it with me: Candidate. Experience. It is 2019 and us terrible millennials have short attention spans and fragile feelings. If we do not feel wanted during the hiring process, why would we think we are wanted in the position? If you think about it, HR is constantly speed dating and it is up to you to make a great first impression…or that timer is going to sound and they are gone forever.

Furthermore, if you are unsure of the process and timelines…use this time to trash it and we will start from scratch.

If money was not a concern – what would a selection process look like for your company?  

Wendy: Our selection process is pretty streamlined already since we use great tools like eSkill to assess on hard skills and behavioral based interviewing for soft skills but I imagine candidates who are interested in our incredible opportunities would be even more responsive if we could pay them whatever they want.

Great word to use: streamlined. Simple, purposeful, and impactful. Side note: Just came up with that myself on the spot… patted myself on the back.

With the candidate pool constantly evolving, what kind of NEW challenges are being presented to you? Additionally, do you think a 4 year degree still holds the same

Wendy: Instead of challenges I would say opportunities for additional innovation would include augmented intelligence to enhance candidate experience (get back to candidates quicker either way regarding their application), Use of video to personalize the interview process from onset in online job postings, getting to a point where candidates can feel comfortable letting recruiters know they are moving on rather than ghosting, educating hiring managers on trends as to your point they are constantly evolving.

I do think a 4 year degree makes sense for some roles but not the majority.  People have the world at their fingertips and can learn whatever they want at whatever pace they want. Some of the best software engineers I know do not have a college degree and were self-taught.

College is a great exploratory opportunity if you have the financial support to attend. However as a parent I would tell you I rather my child go to a couple of online boot camps first before taking on such a large investment. I have many friends who have degrees they will be paying for until they retire.
I am happy to see some high schools offering trades again including coding. The future of work looks so different for generation z and I am fascinated to see what happens.

I told you guys Wendy is a wiz. As the Twitter kids say, she is living in 2060. I asked about the 4 year degree to make a point. Kelly sees this all the time where some of her bigger clients question why their candidate pools are dwindling and the first thing she asks is “what qualifications do they need.” More often than not, a 4 year degree is REQUIRED and if the candidate does not have that, they do not bother applying. You pigeon hole yourself by making that a requirement.

So I challenge you to assess your positions and ask yourself what knowledge is required Day 1 and what can be taught on the job. Then ask yourself, should you be using a Reasoning Test or Behavioral Assessment to make sure they can learn on the job

I have two types of clients: those that live in Texas and those that wish they did. You live just outside the wonderful city of Austin- what is your ideal weekend? 

Wendy: Spending time with my family while Eating Baked Brie with raspberry chipotle sauce on a massive unicorn float that sits in our pool that we get to use almost year round since Texas Summer runs from April to October

Only true Texans understand the massive float situation!

Ethan Painter

I have been a Client Services Manager at eSkill since 2017 and I am involved with multiple industries. I was born in California, raised in Waco, and attended the University of Houston where I received my Bachelors in Finance with a minor in Risk Management. There is nothing more gratifying in this job than helping my clients mold their hiring process to work for them. In my spare time, you can find me on the golf course trying to regain my old form from the glory days in high school.

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